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History of the Rhodes Family name. English (chiefly Yorkshire): topographic name for someone who lived in a clearing in woodland. This, the most common form of the name, has been influenced in spelling by the English name of the Greek island of Rhodes (Greek Rhodos), with which there is no connection.

Early Origins of the Graf family The surname Graf was first found in Switzerland, where the family contributed to the development of the region. They became prominent in local affairs and branched into many houses which played important roles in savage tribal and national conflicts, each group seeking power and status in an ever changing territorial profile.

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William Rhodes of the 2nd Virginia Regiment, Continental Line from 1775-1783:

main imageWilliam Rhodes of the 2nd Virginia Regiment, Continental Line from 1775-1783: The following was printed about William's 2nd Virginia Regiment in the newspaper Virginia Gazette on October 17, 1777: "The heroism and gallantry of the second Virginia regiment I cannot help particularly mentioning; they would do honor to any country in the world. It is universally believed they behaved the best of any troops in the field."

In Alexandria, Virginia on September 1st, 1775,William enlisted as a private soldier for the term of one year, into the first company of the 2nd Virginia Regiment. The company was under the command of Captain George Johnston, and the regiment under Colonel William Woolford. Colonel Woolford and his men were ordered to the town of Norfolk,VA, to stop the attacks and drive the British forces and loyalists out of Virginia under the command of former Royal Governor Lord Dunmore. The first known battle of the 2nd Virginia was at Great Bridge,VA on December 3,1775. Colonel Woolford and his army defeated the British regulars and loyalists of Lord Dunmore. This battle is considered by some to be the "Bunker Hill of the South." The end result was that Dunmore lost his base at Norfolk and soon left the Virginia area. Later that month the soldiers were given their first uniforms at the campus of William and Mary College. They were issued frontier dress which consisted of purple-dyed hunting frocks with capes and cuffs fringed down the front, blue shroud leggings, plain linen shirts with cuffs, round hats, and were given tomahawks. The following year they received a more appropriate military uniform.

On February 13, 1776, the 2nd Virginia was accepted for service into the Continental Line. Earlier that summer, the 2nd Virginia was ordered to New England to join the Continental Army under George Washington. At Williamsburg in August of 1776, enlistments in the regiment were up. Private William Rhodes was regularly discharged and immediately re-enlisted for three years or the length of the war, which was unknown at the time. Compare this to the majority of the veterans who did not re-enlist and went home. Some of the battles the 2nd Virginia participated in during the year of 1776 were in Long Island, Harlem Heights, and White Plains, NY. In September, Col. Woolford resigned and Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Spotswood succeeded as commander of the 2nd Virginia Regiment.

The following was printed about William's 2nd Virginia Regiment in the newspaper Virginia Gazette on October 17, 1777: "The heroism and gallantry of the second Virginia regiment I cannot help particularly mentioning; they would do honor to any country in the world. It is universally believed they behaved the best of any troops in the field."

On January 17, 1777, William's company commander Capt. Thomas Tibbs died, and Capt. John Peyton Harrison succeeded him. Later in the year, the 2nd Virginia was involved in the capture of Elizabethtown, NJ, as well as the Battles of Brandywine and Germantown in Pennsylvania.

During the winter of 1777-1778, the 2nd Virginia encamped at Valley Forge, PA. In December of 1777 at Valley Forge, the regiment had a force of 406 men, but of them 245 were sick. By March of 1778, the 2nd Virginia's total strength had dropped 246 men, a loss of 160 from the previous December. On June 29, 1778, they were involved in the battle of Monmouth, New Jersey.

Early that year, Washington recommended to Congress that in each battalion there be a company of Light Infantry. The Light Infantry was put in the places of most danger, and as Washington said, "[They were] to be constantly near the enemy and give'em every possible annoyance." Then, in August of 1778, there was an order to organize the Light Infantry. The men were handpicked from each regiment. "They were to be the best of men, the most hardy and active marksmen and commanded by good partisan officers." Later training would be personally overseen by drillmaster Baron Von Steuben. The Light Infantry troops were the first on the field of battle, and served as scouts and flankers. To be selected as one of the drafts for this elite force was a great honor. Private. William Rhodes was recorded as a member of the Light Infantry in September of 1778. In June 1779 the Light Infantry companies of Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Virginia Lines were combined in two regiments . Adjutant-General Alexander Scammell reported the following: "the above companies almost to the man are composed of proper-sized well-built men from the five feet seven to five feet nine inches high, who have been in actual service two, three and some almost four years". . . .

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Descendants of William & Susannah Rhodes

William was born in Virginia, little is known of his early life, but at age 30, in 1775, he enlisted in to the Revolution. After nearly eight years, in 1783 he was discharged. His tour of duty took him from NY to GA, and during that time received many battle scars even serving two bayonet wounds to the abdomen. in the service of his country. He married Susannah after the war & they would eventually settle in what is now Urbana, OH.

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Our Families

Our Ancestors Were Adventurers
Wm Rhodes Family
William Rhodes

William Rhodes

1745-1825

Born in VA, & after nearly eight years of service in the Revolution he married Susannah. Then settled in KY where the they lived around 12 years. At about 1800 the family migrated to OH there Wm bought land near the present day town Urbana. Wm died in 1825, Susannah died at a later date.

Levi B. Grove Family
Levi B. Grove Jr

Levi B. Grove Jr

1829-1903

He was a veteran of the Civil War. His first wife was Nancy Murphy, 1832-1865, they married in 1852. His second Permilia Pitts, 1837-1916, married 20 May 1866. Both Nancy Murphy/Grove, & Permilia Pitts/Grove had six children each.

The Tidd Family
Martin Tidd Sr

Martin Tidd Sr

1739-1837

Martin was born and raised in backwoods of rural PA, where witnessed the killing and scalping of his father in 1756. He served in the armed forces in the Revolutionary War as a private in "Robinson's Rangers".

Perry Stocker Family
Perry, & Rosa (Dorsey) Stocker

Perry, & Rosa (Dorsey) Stocker

Perry, Rosa (Dorsey) his wife, Blanche, and baby Florence Stocker



Betsy Foley/Gerardbottom image

Both of Betsy's grandfathers fought in the Revolutionary War.

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Fredrick P. Valleybottom image

Fred is the grandfather of Robert 'Bobby' Franklin. His parents were Reuben E. Valley and Sarah Ann Trucker.

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