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Homo sapiens, Earlier Still – Archaeology Magazine

Homo sapiens, Earlier Still – Archaeology Magazine

Jebel Irhoud, Morocco

Excavations at Jebel Irhoud, near Morocco’s west coast, have uncovered the 300,000-year-old bones of some of the earliest members of the Homo sapiens lineage. Human bones were first discovered at the site in 1961, and their strange combination of archaic and modern features intrigued scientists, who guessed they belonged to Neanderthals and dated to about 40,000 years ago. In 2006, a team led by Jean-Jacques Hublin of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology reopened excavations at Jebel Irhoud. This year, they revealed their results, providing a glimpse of the earliest members of the ancestral line that led to modern humans. To read more on this follow the link below:

Source: www.archaeology.org/issues/282-features/top10/6181-morocco-jebel-irhoud-early-homo-sapiens

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Rhoades, Rhoads, Rhodes, Rhodus, Roads, de Rodes, Rodes Family Genealogy

Iron Age Britain’s Oldest Gold – Archaeology Magazine

Iron Age Britain’s Oldest Gold – Archaeology Magazine

Staffordshire, England.  Four torcs uncovered in Leekfrith are the earliest Iron Age gold items ever found in Britain. Torcs are jewelry that were worn around neck, by both men and women.  They can be dated to between 400 and 250 B.C. based on their stylistic qualities, says Julia Farley of the British Museum, who notes they were most likely worn by women. The torcs’ age is remarkable because, for several hundred years starting around 800 B.C., people in Britain appear to have largely abandoned wearing and manufacturing gold jewelry.  Follow the link below for more on these:

Source: www.archaeology.org/issues/282-features/top10/6176-england-iron-age-gold-torcs